Stop Blaming Your Metabolism; It’s Probably Not Causing Your Weight Gain

Streak Day: 1320
YTD Mileage: 1,297.4
133.02 lbs
19.0 Body fat

metabolism meme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s the thing. People (including my doctor) keep telling me that people should just expect to gain weight as they age, as if weight gain after a certain age is axiomatic. As a function of aging, so they say, our metabolism slows down every year. Supposedly. I reject that particular piece of conventional wisdom. If weight gain as one ages is unavoidable, I wonder, why isn’t everyone over a certain age pudgy and cushiony, with a pregnant looking abdomen? Although I do have friends who have put on weight in the past few years, I have others who have not. Dear Hubby, as well as his sisters who are in their late forties to mid-fifties, remain as thin as ever (and hubby Phillip still eats as he did when he was teenager). His sisters’ refusal to gain weight as they age remains a little frustrating to me. Two of his four sisters don’t even work out that much. Phillip at least runs and goes to the gym regularly. Continue reading “Stop Blaming Your Metabolism; It’s Probably Not Causing Your Weight Gain”

Shocker! Running Daily Does Not Prevent Weight Gain

Streak Day: 1309
YTD Mileage: 1,222
134.00 lbs
19.9 body fat

Oh, yes! I am in shock over my sudden weight gain. Other than for health reasons beyond my control, I’ve never had to worry about my weight. Even before I started running at the age of 44, I never had to watch weight. I was actually too thin, until 2006 when, after years of misdiagnosis, I was finally diagnosed by a GI with celiac disease. I gained a healthy twenty pounds when I started the necessary gluten-free diet and I held steady at the healthy weight of 130 (my height is 5’7). Then suddenly in the spring of 2014, and I do mean suddenly, I gained ten pounds and nearly 10% body fat. The sudden body fat gain indicated a metabolic problem. I also had myriad other symptoms, so I saw my doctor for the problem. He ordered thyroid testing and discovered that my thyroid had stopped working. Continue reading “Shocker! Running Daily Does Not Prevent Weight Gain”

A Run A Day Keeps the Lazies Away???

I notice that the date of my last blog post is February 7th, some – uummm – three months ago. The space

1st Place AG @ Cocoa Women's Half Marathon, January 2015
1st Place AG @ Cocoa Women’s Half Marathon, January 2015

between that post and the previous is even greater! At that time, I only brought my blog up to date concerning my goal of finishing my first 50k. I’ve set some running goals and run some races between my successful Cloudsplitter 50k completion and now. I’ll recap swiftly! I set and met a goal to run a sub-two Decker Challenge Half-Marathon in December (chip time 1:56:57, 4 / 22 AG). I set and met a goal to run a sub-two Cocoa Women’s Half in January (Chip time 1:53:10, 1 / 44 in AG). I set and failed at the goal of a 4:15 – 4:30 full Austin Marathon (see Wild Hare 50k, same song, second verse as they say). I turned off at the half, and finished with probably the slowest half time since the first half I ever ran. I saved face some with the next race after that one – which happened to be the very next Saturday: the Street to Feet 5k (chip time 25:09, 1 / 32 AG). My business (ATX Ultra Eats) sponsored the inaugural Mission for Life 5k / Half-Marathon on March 21st. I ran the 5k; the half-marathon was turned into a 20 miler at the last minute, due to flooding of the course along the San Antonio River. Continue reading “A Run A Day Keeps the Lazies Away???”

Cloudsplitter Race Report: A 50k Finally Successfully Accomplished!

cloudsplitter 3I see that, um, about eight months or so have passed since I last posted a blog on this site (re-blog about the smoothie notwithstanding). Since the last time I really wrote a post for this site, I finished the book I had just ordered at that time, Less Than A Minute to Go (Thierfelder, St Benedict Press), and successfully completed my first 50k: Cloudsplitter 100. When I last blogged, I mentioned that I ordered Thierfelder’s book for inspiration as I trained for Cloudsplitter. The book did inspire me, and reading the book gave me a change in perspective about pain and suffering that helped increase my self-confidence before I began the race. Before I discuss the helpful aspects of the Thierfelder’s work, the former freshman composition instructor in me has to report the negative aspects of the book: the writer’s inferior style and the work’s apparent lack of proper editing. I feel somewhat uncomfortable writing anything negative about Bill Thierfelder’s work; I greatly admire his character and his faith. Given that Thierfelder is the president of a college, however, his work must be held to a high standard.

Throughout the book, Thierfelder quotes extensively. His quoted material is often too long, sometimes about as long as an entire page. In such cases the proper method of quoting is for the writer to summarize the context of the quote for brevity’s sake, then quote only the most striking lines of the quote that the writer believes best express the point he’s trying to make by using the quotation. Even more distressing than Thierfelder’s too generous use of quoted material is his chaotic use of documentation following the quoted material and facts and figures he uses throughout the book. His citation of sources is inconsistent as far as any formal citation style (such as MLA, APA, or Chicago), and it’s even inconsistent within the work itself. Furthermore, until the last section of the book, the work seems to lack organization. The strength of Thierfelder’s writing comes through only at the end of the book, when he relates the secret of improving and succeeding in one’s sport-related performance to improving one’s relationship with God. Although he touches on the relationship between one’s spiritual growth and one’s improved sport performance throughout the book, the relationship seems too loosely connected until the last chapter of the book: at this point Thierfelder’s successfully illustrates the way one’s faith can infuse and positively impact every aspect of his life, even his sport performance. Continue reading “Cloudsplitter Race Report: A 50k Finally Successfully Accomplished!”

Accountability and Running: Being Better Than One’s Self

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View From Lamar St Bridge During Run:11 June 13

“Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it’s hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clear-headedness that follow a long run.” (Monte Davis)

“Don’t bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself.” (William Faulkner, “The Art of Fiction, no 12,” The Paris Review, 1956)

I really have no idea who Monte Davis is. This quote appears on plenty of running sites, but no one sources it. I googled him but could find no information about him as an athlete. I wish I knew who he is, because I really take issue with these words that are attributed to him all over the web. Honestly, one is quite able to run and feel sorry for herself at the same time! When the weather is rainy, cold, and dark but she has to get in that last five miles to meet her goal for the week; when she has one hill rep left but the previous five, six, or seven reps have sapped all her strength; when her will to run battles her will be back at home eating ice cream and reading a book: oh, yes, feeling sorry for oneself while simultaneously running is indeed possible. But since misery honestly seems to love company, a runner is more likely to complete her running goals when she shares her goals with other runners, and also helps them to achieve their own goals. Continue reading “Accountability and Running: Being Better Than One’s Self”